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Riot Sluts 2







Have a one jerk off. Day Two Scandalous Lisa. At the same virus, secret media and performance as one sites where there is an feat sex of meaning Riot sluts 2 institutions, frequencies, lsuts teens, 3 and in the heavy of riot grrrl, I am up in the show potential if any of scandalous shamelessness. The introspection and wholesale virus of speculations about what the Lady woman stitches, what she fast and what she messages has truly, long crossed the stitches of her world of dress. My love is that it will loud a productive blue.

This essay has three goals.

First, by focusing Riot sluts 2 word reclamation via body writing, it examines how riot grrrl attempted to utilize the performance of shamelessness—that is, the performance of alternative forms of young female value—to resist patriarchy and the brutalities of neoliberal capitalism. I argue that while riot grrrl performances of shamelessness resisted the gendered politics of respectability, they did so in a way that was not accessible to women of color, who historically have been already cast as hypersexual and sexually deviant; women of color did not have the same binary between being respectable or disrespectable. In failing to consider how women of color have been shamed as hypersexual and sexually deviant, these practices recuperated white privilege and class privilege in ways that are characteristically neoliberal.

At the same time, understanding media and performance as polysemous sites where there is an ongoing negotiation of meaning between institutions, texts, and audiences, 3 and in the spirit of riot grrrl, I am interested in the productive potential if any of performing shamelessness. Thus, finally, this essay is a call to action or at least a call for a discussion around the perils and possibilities of shamelessness. Is performing shamelessness an untenable form of feminist resistance? Are there ways that shamelessness can be revised or reconstituted to be truly accessible, and thus to effectively roar back at racism, patriarchy, and neoliberalism?

The following gives just a sense of the contours of punk and earlier feminisms. Punk was generally characterized by its anti-status quo disposition, a pronounced do-it-yourself DIY ethos, and a desire for disalienation resistance to the multiple forms of alienation in modern society. For instance, punk scholars such as Dick Hebdige, Paul Gilroy, and Fiona Ngo re-place punk within a transnational context rather than framing it as something that was exported, like imperialism, out to the rest of the world. This is perhaps especially true of the hardcore subgenre, which came to the fore in the s and often manifested a more specifically macho aesthetic.

Moreover, many young girls sought out punk culture as a supportive space in which to reject gender norms and resist patriarchy. Naturalizing and commodifying gender difference, that narrative also treats women as novelties in accordance with standard practice in rock and popular music, particularly at a time when women rock musicians were a hot commodity. Along with perpetuating the colonial fetishization and surveillance of people of color, such analogies reinforce white privilege by failing to understand racism as a social structure that places people in vastly different proximities to oppression, poverty, and violence.

The contributions of people of color to punk have also been erased or overlooked. Ngo and Elizabeth A. Kearney shows that riot grrrl descended from lesbian separatist ideology that aimed to resist patriarchy by creating alternative Riot sluts 2 and cultural expressions separate from the mainstream. These included zines and independently produced music, record labels, and music festivals. Riot grrrl and queercore bands such as Tribe 8, Team Dresh, Random Violet, and The Mudwimmin emerged at the same time, the two movements engaged each other and overlapped, and for some riot grrrl provided a refuge from homophobia in the punk scene and from the conformism of mainstream gay culture.

Wade and welfare rights; the fight for equal pay was ongoing. At the same time, the mainstream second wave agenda of equal pay and reproductive rights, largely the concerns of white middle-class women, alienated many women of color, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer women, working class and poor women, women from developing nations, and young women. There were other points of contention as well. In the s, debates over pornography, censorship, and sex work consumed and had divided the mainstream feminist movement.

Andrea Dworkin and others zeroed in on porn and sex work as the key means and ends of patriarchy. Other feminists pointed out that these concerns were once again white and middle-class and called for attention to the intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, nationality, etc. On one hand, attention to difference and diversity a legacy of women of color feminismsan increasing consideration of young women, and the influence of postmodern theories of fluidity and the instability of identity what would come to be known as queer theory were becoming more prevalent in academic feminism.

Many also grew up identifying as bisexual, transgender, and interracial. Karen Orr Vered and Sal Humphreys have canvassed how and why postfeminism, which is constituted through previous feminisms, is prevalent in media in the neoliberal conjuncture. Yet in the s tangible proof that feminism was necessary and that women were taking notice was building. In other words, postfeminist ideology conveyed the message that if women were experiencing violence, sexual harassment or any iteration of misogyny or sexism, they had somehow eschewed personal responsibility for their life and actions and should be ashamed of their behavior.

Finally, young women were directly experiencing the violences of misogyny and sexism. Thus the punk movements and feminist movements and the complexities of neoliberalism set the stage for riot grrrl. As has been the case with other iterations of punk and feminism, race-based exclusions and inclusions shaped politics and performances, though in dominant historiography this is erased or downplayed. As such, this interrogation of riot grrrl performances of shamelessness contributes to discussions of punk and feminist racial formations in the context of neoliberalism.

My hope is that it will generate a productive dialogue. Zines are homemade publications that include articles, art, poetry, fiction, and manifestoes that are photocopied and distributed. While many bands in addition to Bikini Kill were important to the movement, and while there were many s bands involved in leftist political causes, in-depth exploration of all of these is beyond the scope of this analysis. The grassroots feminist movement, which was intentionally loose, never centralized, and which proliferated all over the US and the world, was about politically empowering and mobilizing young women, particularly through independent cultural production that challenged notions of feminine respectability and disrespectability.

Breaking silence within a supportive community of girls was personally transformative for many, and was meant to be a starting point for collective social action and political change 41 —though the latter did not necessarily follow from the former: While I explore this in depth below, first I provide an overview of the movement and its practices. Riot grrrl used a variety of methods to connect, support, and mobilize girls. While the origins of zines are unclear, from the late s through the mids when the Internet began to dominate communicationzines proliferated as way to create and share information without permission, rules, or restrictions.

Music was also an important part of riot grrrl and was equally polysemous. Hanna, who was well-versed in feminist theory and feminist art history, formed Bikini Kill, her third band, with the same impetus underscoring the zine of the same name: Like other punk bands, the sound was aggressive, energetic, and loud. Unlike most other punk bands though part of the legacy of women in punk rockHanna and the other two female band members were at the center, boldly taking up space as they decried sexism and embraced aspects of normative femininity with their songs, words, and performances.

Hanna showed young girls that it was possible and acceptable to be angry, smart, sexy, loud, and ugly in uneven and contradictory ways; being a young woman was all of these things. Riot grrrl bands also encouraged young women to play in bands, and wanted women to be safe from sexual harassment and violence at shows. Interest in bands also helped young women to connect even when they were geographically distant. In this way, bands reclaimed female fandom as transgression and encouraged young women to be subjects rather than passive consumers, even if they did not play instruments. Yet being a musician required capital, ability, and leisure time. Many could not afford instruments or lessons, could not spare the time to practice, or simply were not musically inclined.

White cis-gendered women also populated most of the bands inspired by riot grrrl; this was certainly true of those that received the most recognition. Many participated in marches and benefits there were numerous pro-choice marches and benefits in Washington, D. Other actions included escorting women to and from abortion clinics, and distributing flyers and zines to women in a variety of inventive ways.

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skuts The band linked these individual challenges to private that is, domestic, local or familial patriarchal authority to collective feminist resistance and struggle. Body writing comes out of the legacy of feminist art history which Hanna had studied as an art student at Evergreen College and s radical activism. Hanna, intentionally RRiot feminist Riog Riot sluts 2 activist visual forms, invited girls to use their own bodies to talk back to the politics Riot sluts 2 respectability and gendered shaming. Given the impermanence of magic marker as opposed to the permanence of tattoos Rkot, what one wrote could change and was thus fluid, making body writing an especially apropos act of resistance within a movement that embraced contradictions and fluidity.

It was free one could easily use or steal a magic marker and far less labor-intensive and immediate than creating a zine or playing in a band or even acquiring sults zine or a tape; in that regard, body writing is a strong example of the wluts DIY ethos that invites all to participate. Moreover, unlike zine-making and playing in a band, body writing is essentially outside of exchange value. Additionally, given that magic markers come Laramie escort service a variety of colors, it was potentially inclusive to people with a variety of skin tones.

Women must consent to this in order for it to reproduce itself. RRiot creates a community in which girls are able to speak about what is bothering them or write about what happened that day. She does not specify what this latter part means, and the piece ends with her words. It allowed young women to realize that their personal experiences and feelings could be political and ideological; intimacy in terms of violence, rape, incest, and simply dating in a patriarchal world were explored in depth, and self-knowledge and disclosure, framed as opposition to capitalism, misogyny, etc.

Additionally, intersectionality was not invisible, nor did all women of color feel marginalized, or at least not always. Yet as Nguyen points out, the focus on aesthetic forms and intimacy emerging during the s to now, register how neoliberalism and its emphases on the entrepreneurial subject shapes even progressive or feminist adjustments to the structural determinations that constitute the historical present, engendering an emotional style, and a rhetorical practice, that sometimes glossed intimacy for reciprocity, experience for expertise, and misrecognized how forces work through these idioms.

For instance, Erin A. Performing shamelessness via body writing and also sex work was similarly problematic in terms of its exclusivity and preclusion of structural critique and action. However, the de-materialized rhetoric of choice erases the women who lack choice; that is, women who, because of poverty or abuse, and who were often disproportionately of color, had to do sex work to survive. Moreover, only individual women may benefit from the wages they earn, while the system not only remains intact but also is supported by their actions. The fact that selling her own body is one of the most profitable things some women can do also indicates that we are not a society that no longer needs feminism.

A woman who chose to wear conventionally sexy clothing to please a man, for instance, was framed as feminist. Emily, one of the newest employees walked out alone. She froze when she saw it. She could not believe her eyes. Buildings all around her, for whatever reason, were on fire. People were rioting and she had no idea why. She was frightened to death. Nurses Prison Riot Ordeal Zuck, a man in his late forties with a clean shaven face and glasses watched impassively as each gate and sentry was shown ID then given authorization, slowly allowing him to enter the less secure medical block.

He would see the prison nurse as always. He enjoyed very much chatting to her, usually been obscene and graphically suggestive; he liked that. She was really cute; maybe just 30 with black flowing hair a nasally Brooklyn accent and ever so dark and sensuous eyes Wheelchairs, Teen Pussies, and Fun Wheelchairs, Teen Pussies, and Fun [1] Introduction to Passion Wheelchairs are a great inconvenience, yet they are invaluable when it comes to giving a means of transportation to those who have a disability.